#TBT: Revisiting Affirmative Action

#TBT: Revisiting Affirmative Action

This week, it was revealed by the New York Times that the Department of Justice, rather than focusing on actual civil rights injustices, will be attacking affirmative action.  The false narrative that DOJ is clearly following, is that White Americans are being discriminated against by affirmative action programs.

Really?

The Supreme Court disagreed  last year, stating that race can be one of the factors considered.  It should never be the only factor considered — that would clearly be discriminatory.

Additionally, the idea of legacy admissions — where children of wealthy donors/alumni are able to obtain admission to schools, regardless of whether their academic performance meets the criteria — seems to not be a part of the review process.

During oral arguments of this case, Justice Scalia made some pretty controversial (and in my opinion, racist) comments.  Here’s a piece I wrote at the time in response.

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Photo courtesy of CreateHerStock

I am not ashamed to say it. I am a product of affirmative action.

Was I slow? Have trouble learning? Issues adapting to my environment?

Absolutely not.

My grades were certainly competitive enough to get me from high school to undergraduate to law school. I went on to pass the bar exam, have a long career as a prosecutor, teach, and hold leadership positions in various community as well as national organizations.

My profile is far from unusual. Affirmative action may aid one in getting in; but one has to perform to stay in. But to lump all students of one race into the category of being “slow learners” because they entered a university based on a more broad based criteria is shockingly ignorant. That appears to be the thrust of your statement “There are those who contend that it does not benefit African-Americans to get them into the University of Texas where they do not do well, as opposed to having them go to a less-advanced school, a less — a slower-track school where they do well”. There is a misconception that affirmative action scrapes the bottom of the barrel of African-American students in order to preserve diversity. That is not the case; all the African-American students I know were able to compete as well as or exceed their white counterparts. The test is a long term one – whether or not the student succeeds academically, graduates, and what they do afterwards.

Read the rest here.