Dear White Women: Black Women Are Taking Our Moment

Vice President Elect Kamala Harris and her niece.

It took T minus one day. 

I was scrolling through the myriads of Facebook groups when I saw a post of Vice President elect Kamala Harris speaking to her little grand niece, telling her she can be President. The person who posted it, who was a Black woman, stated “all little Black girls now know anything is possible”. In the comments a white woman said “it should be ALL girls”. 

And here we are again in the debate of “all” vs. Black. 

The comment ignored the reality that representation matters. While women have come far in this country, white women have done better. Racism prevented Black women from getting the same head start. White women received the right to vote before Black women – with some white suffragettes fighting to prevent our forefathers from voting before them. There have been four white women on the Supreme Court; there has yet to be a Black woman. White women are paid more at work and are less likely to die in childbirth. There are nine white female governors in this country; we have yet to have a Black female governor. The closest in recent history, Stacy Abrams was robbed of her win via voter suppression in GA. Despite this painful loss, she still tirelessly organized voters to lead Georgia to resoundingly swing for Biden/Harris.  Meanwhile, 55% of white women still voted for the person who would like nothing more than to make this country a version of the Handmaid’s Tale. 

It’s a different feeling when you have been left (or pushed) out of the conversation for centuries, and you finally see yourself in a position of power. The same way white women celebrated when Hillary Clinton became the Dem pres nominee is the same way Black women are feeling today with seeing a Black Woman as VP. 

Think of it this way. A television station in Ireland ended its broadcast by talking about how Joe Biden is a proud Irish American, with his reading of a poem by Seamus Heaney. He is only the second person of Irish descent to be in the White House (the first being John F. Kennedy). I fully expect celebrations and pride by our Irish friends on both sides of the Atlantic – and rightfully so. I would never state to an Irish person who expressed pride over this accomplishment “this is for ALL of us, not just you”. While true, it’s insulting. I’m pretty sure the Facebook poster and others who feel like she does didn’t post similar comments on an Irish person’s page. There is nothing wrong with celebrating accomplishments of people who you identify with through culture, ethnicity, gender alma mater or otherwise – as long as you are not treating other people badly. 

The “all” narrative has been a battle as we discuss criminal justice reform and Black Lives Matter. To put it simply – it’s like showing up to a breast cancer fundraiser and saying “but all cancers matter”. Yes they do – but the discussion right now is about breast cancer. So have a seat. 

This is part of that casual racism that ignores history. Comments like these are a daily reminder of how much work there is to do in this country. Racism exists in both parties, and addressing it is way overdue. 

All is great when all people are actually included intentionally as well as consistently. 

Until that happens, Black women are taking our moment.

See it on the 94 Percent here.

The Dawn of A New Day

My reflections on our historic Election Day, which appeared in the Miami Times.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File

It was 11:45am. I was getting ready for brunch with a mentee. The news flashed across the screen of my phone – we have a new President. Immediately I screamed for my husband and shared the news. So many emotions ran through me  — joy, pride, tears, and laughter. It was an overwhelming feeling of relief and vindication to see Joe Biden win the race to become our 46th president. In all of this, I felt the joy even more acutely due to a personal connection. I remembered when I first met Vice President- elect Kamala Harris nearly a decade ago. It was during the National Black Prosecutors Association conference in July 2010. At that time, she was the San Francisco District Attorney. During our brief interaction, it was clear Ms. Harris was so sharp yet incredibly kind. It’s wild to think that I had been speaking to the future Vice President of the United States.  To see a woman of Jamaican heritage like myself follow the path of being a prosecutor, then successfully running for District Attorney, California Attorney General, United States Senator, and now Vice President gave me so much hope and promise. 

By the same token, I still feel sadness. Knowing that more than 70 million Americans are either racist or racist adjacent (accepting of racism) is a hard pill to swallow. I knew it was out there, but seeing the quantitative data – a hard number – is tough. It broke my heart to really digest this about the country (as well as the county) in which I live. Hopefully it’s a temporary emotion that will subside with time while focusing on the hard work ahead to rebuild. But the Trump vote is a clear vote against police accountability, control of our communities and destiny, and voting rights, in favor of – supposedly – the economy; but in actuality, supporting white extremism and preserving the status quo. 

The road ahead is very long; we are in a period of time in this nation much like the Reconstruction era after the Civil War. There will be anger, followed by a lot of introspection. Hopefully, we emerge a little bit more conscious as to who we are as a country, with a new focus on who we want to be. 

As the millennials say, please “miss me” with any pronouncements that racism is over due to Kamala Harris being elected. Her opponent’s words and actions, as well as those of some Republican leaders, made this very clear. I am reminded of comments made by the Miami GOP chair who stated on Facebook Live election night, “if you do not want a Kamala Harris presidency- because you know that is what it will be – go out and vote.” That is a stark reminder of where we are. The dog whistle was clearly designed to motivate racists and sexists. Also, seeing recent events where the University of Miami Republican club made racial slurs regarding Kamala Harris, with no real public rebuke by university officials or the GOP leadership, shows the level of racism from the new generation on up to current leadership. 

Even more troubling, in this time of celebration, there are some African Americans (mostly men) who have made comments that Vice President-elect Harris’ status as a daughter of immigrants somehow doesn’t reflect the experiences of African Americans — suggesting their ancestors would not be proud of this moment in the same way. We saw an increase of support for the outgoing administration in the African American community (albeit small).  While we celebrate, we have to be cognizant of the work that needs to be done to heal the divides in our own community. Pitting Black immigrants against Black Americans does nothing to move our interests forward. We’ve seen it locally this election cycle. It’s insulting as well as destructive. The racists are betting on the effectiveness of the divide and conquer strategy; we cannot let them succeed. 

I did meet my mentee. 

We laughed, cried, celebrated and toasted to the victory. 

And now, the work commences.

Melba Pearson is the Director of Policy and Programs at the Center for the Administration of Justice at FIU, focused on prosecutorial reform. She is a former Miami homicide prosecutor and Deputy Director of the ACLU of Florida. Follow her on Twitter @ResLegalDiva.

Reset, Recharge, Relaunch!

African-American woman meditating in lotus position. Photo credit: Getty Images

Hi RLD Fam!

I hope this email finds all of you healthy and well.

2020 has been quite a whirlwind for everyone without a shadow of a doubt. It was also the year I decided to run for Miami Dade State Attorney. The phrase “how oft go astray the plans of mice and men” rings so true. While I deeply wanted to serve my community in this way, life had other plans.

After the election ended on August 18, I was offered, and accepted, the position of Director of Policy and Programs at the Center for the Administration of Justice at Florida International University. I will be working on prosecutorial reform and other criminal justice issues nationally as well as globally. It’s really exciting!

In the meantime, it’s all about November. We are constantly being reminded how elections have far reaching consequences. With the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, we are seeing her reliably progressive voice being replaced by someone who is the exact polar opposite of her values. I wrote about Justice Ginsberg’s legacy in the Miami Times; see more here.

But in more positive news, I’m thrilled that someone who is a true trailblazer and role model for women of color – Kamala Harris – be on the ticket this November! It would be amazing to see her as the first female Vice President, and the first African American Vice President in our history! After going through a grueling campaign for eight months, I feel a special kinship with her. We faced similar criticisms, including having our “Black card” tested. Long time readers of the blog know how I feel about Senator Harris – but if you need a refresher, here are some of the pieces I’ve written about her work over the years.

Legal Divas of Color: Kamala Harris

Legal Divas of Color: Kamala Harris – Again!

New on The Root: You Can Be Pro-Black and a Prosecutor

As the year winds down, I will be looking for new ways to engage with everyone and give you the content you want to see! Please sound off in the comments – what would you like on RLD? More videos? Personal reflections? More legal analysis? Let me know!

 Mondays With Melba continue weekly!
Every Monday at 6pm, I discuss current events, politics and the law.
Please go to either Facebook or IGTV to catch up on past episodes. Recent topics include how to vote safely, amendments on the Florida ballot, and legal analysis of the Breonna Taylor case.
I’ll be adding more videos to the blog in the future too!

Legal Divas of Color: Kamala Harris – Again!

kamala harris
Senator Kamala Harris

Greetings RLD Family,

As we close another Black History Month, we have one more trailblazing attorney to feature – Kamala Harris.

She is no stranger to the RLD Family – I featured her several times, because every time I write a post about her, the next year she breaks another barrier! Coincidence? Hmmm…

Her first feature here was in 2014, when she was the first woman of color to become the Attorney General for the State of California. Kamala was back in 2015 when she ran to succeed Senator Barbara Boxer in representing California as a United States Senator.

Since then, Kamala ran for President, but was unsuccessful in making it to the primary stage. In the early days of her campaign, I wrote an article in the Root that went viral about the case for maintaining an open mind about her record as a prosecutor. One thing is for sure — people either love her or hate her. I often wonder why Senator Amy Klobucher is not facing the same brutal treatment that Kamala received about her past. Not that I advocate for tearing folks down, but if it is really about records and nothing else, there should be equal levels of scrutiny.

But that’s a post for another day.

While unfortunate, it was a joy to see Senator Harris dancing with her staff as her presidential campaign ended. It was a vision of grace and resilience in the face of intense disappointment; and generosity in attempting to lift the spirits of folks who worked so hard for the dream.

Thank you Senator Kamala Harris for continuing to be a Legal Diva of Color by blazing trials, and challenging us to do better daily!

kamala 2020
Photo Credit: Chris Carlson, AP

 

 

 

Legal Divas of Color: Pamela Carter

Hi RLD Fam!

Although the campaign trail has been absolutely insane, I could not let the month of February go without my “Legal Divas of Color” feature! Every Black History Month, I feature trailblazing female attorneys of color who laid the foundation for us to succeed. Today, I’m featuring Pamela Carter, who was the first African American woman elected to be a state attorney general in the nation!

Pamela Carter was born in 1949 in South Haven, Michigan. She received her undergraduate degree at University of Detroit; her Masters in Social Work at University of Michigan; and her law degree (Juris Doctor) at Indiana University School of Law. Before seeking statewide office, she worked for Indiana’s Secretary of State as an enforcement attorney.

Photo of Pamela Carter, 1992
Pamela Carter, as featured in Black Enterprise in 1992

She decided to take on an incumbent (Linley Pearson, no relation) for the seat of Indiana Attorney General. It was a brutal race and an uphill battle – she was a Democrat in a heavily Republican State. Only one African American had been elected to statewide office in Indiana before her. Nevertheless, she persisted! She won 52% – 48% in November of 1992.

Her election was historic. She became the first elected African American state Attorney General in the country; the first African American and the first female Attorney General in Indiana’s history; and the second African American to hold statewide office. She was also the first Democrat to serve in that post in 24 years.

Ms. Carter served from 1993-1997. She centered diversity in her administration by appointing women and minorities to senior positions where there were none previously. In reflecting on her term, she said “we had a fabulous office. We won more U.S. Supreme Court cases and more Best Brief Awards than any other attorney general’s office in the nation”.

After her term, she spent 18 years at the Cummins Distribution Business, retiring as President in 2015. She currently serves on the board for Teach For America.

Thank you Pamela Carter for being a trailblazing Legal Diva of Color!

Pamela Carter